Structural Penetrations in Standing Seam Metal Roofs

Posted on December 8, 2016 by kbuchinger

In our prior post on “Pipe Penetrations in Standing Seam Metal Roofs,” we identified important guidelines for when pipe penetrations are made to metal roofing systems, typically after the metal roofing is installed. That means an opening is cut in the metal roofing, it is properly flashed or sealed, and the penetrating member is passed through it. However, some penetrations are already in place before the roofing contractor shows up. These can be things like vertical members resting on the building structure that support a platform for HVAC equipment above the sloped roof. Or, it can be parapet wall with offsets or other conditions that are already in place. In cases like this, a different approach is needed to assure that the roof remains watertight.

Equipment Platforms for Structural Penetrations

Penetrations
Structural Penetrations in Standing Seam Metal Roofs

From the standpoint of a roofer, a structural equipment platform is a pre-existing condition. The metal roofing industry already recognizes the need to address such situations, particularly on existing buildings, by offering retrofit flashing and curb products. The same, proven approach can be used when pre-existing conditions are encountered on new buildings as well. For example, when structural posts for equipment platforms are encountered running up through the roof plane, roof jacks and curbs specifically designed for retrofit applications should be used. The retrofit roof jack, or boot, should be made out of rubber and be designed to install around the penetration, rather than over it. The boot should ideally rest on a two-piece retrofit pipe curb which can span across one or more standing seams and create a smooth, flat surface for the boot to be attached and sealed. The two-piece design allows for the pipe curb to be properly shingled on the up slope and down slope side of the roofing, thus preventing a “backwater lap,” which will leak. Trying to use only products intended for new construction on such conditions will require unwarranted field modifications or an over-reliance on caulking and sealant, all of which can be prone to problems and failure of the watertight abilities of the roofing.

Parapets

The use of parapet walls around some or all of a perimeter of a building is a common condition. However, if the building shape varies, and the parapet along with it, then there may be some rather uncommon conditions in which the roofing meets an offset or irregularly shaped parapet walls. The issue is that water coming down the sloped roof runs into the offset or other obstruction, causing a buildup of water and a potential leak. The typical approach is to provide a cricket, which is flashed into the parapet wall and diverts water away from the corner created by the offset. It is important, in this case, to be aware that standard sheet metal crickets have not proven to be effective. Instead, welded aluminum crickets and fixtures are recommended to create a truly watertight seal. Also, the welded cricket can be “shingled” into the roof to prevent “backwater laps.” The key is to provide a complete seal at the corners by welding the material, which cannot be done with sheet metal crickets.

Design Planning

The best way to address all of the structural roof penetration issues described here is with proper upfront planning. Avoiding any of these conditions would of course be ideal, and perhaps they can be designed out of some projects. However, if they’re unavoidable, then the roofing contractor and the design professionals need to review the conditions together ahead of time. This advance design planning is the best way to assure that the best, most effective detailing is employed and the proper materials are available on site.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *